My Baby Can Not Read.

SARAH CARTER

My son is 20 months old and regularly says about ten words: bye bye, dog, truck, ball, Dad, meow*, roar*, ssssss*, uh oh, yes, no, oh dear, and something that sounds suspiciously like “Oh shit,” which despite my foul mouth, I don’t ever say. (However, if he were whispering “Oh, for f**k’s sake” under his breath several times a day, I might be responsible.)

He can also express his confusion about where things are by throwing his hands up near his shoulders in a permanent shrug:

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I have spent a lot of time super frustrated and mildly panicked about this child’s lack of verbal communication. It seems like many (most?) kids his age have, at the very least, more robust vocabularies, and at the very most, the ability to hold complete conversations with their parents. Reminding myself that we live in a world of never ending competition, as we all try to impress and outdo each other on social media, helps me stay sane while I parent my son who refuses to speak. Our desires to present ourselves as brilliant and successful have trickled down to our infants, such that even actual babies are now expected to perform academic or physical feats once reserved for preschoolers. (Seriously. Why would I want to pay someone to pretend to teach my baby to read?)

In an effort to focus on the positives and stay grounded in the comforting knowledge that my child is a behaving like a toddler because he is a toddler, I’ve decided to make a list of my son’s most impressive skills. Here they are, in no particular order:

  1. He is fabulous at pointing. He’s the best pointer. He has recently discovered his pointing prowess and now does it all the time. He learned how to sign “milk” when he was about ten months old and used it constantly for nearly a year, but recently he just taps a finger into my chest over and over again when he wants to nurse before bedtime. We’re so proud. (The other day, he surprised both of us by asking for milk by actually vocalizing the word, and then when I asked him to repeat it “using his mouth,” he unhinged his jaws like a giant snake and shoved all his fingers in his mouth. #success.)
  2. He has excellent fine motor control. He loves drawing all over the couch (with nearly proper pencil grip!) and he recently managed to escape the backyard via a gate that is secured with a deadbolt and a latch.
  3. He can cover his tracks. For reasons that remain a mystery to me, the water heater is in a closet in his bedroom, making this closet a strict no-fly zone. I left him alone in his room for a few seconds, and then heard him slam the closet door and pretend to play with the cars on his floor after he heard me coming back upstairs.
  4. He loves magic. A few weeks ago, he hid my car and house keys by throwing them so deep into the kitchen trash can that they escaped my initial search through the garbage. I had to go through the trash twice! So impressive.
  5. He’s polite. He once put his tiny hands around my neck and squeezed, a la Tina Fey’s daughter, but he did it with a smile.
  6. He knows what he wants. He delights in carrying pairs of his shoes to me and smacking me with them until I put them on his feet, only to immediately demand to wear different shoes.
  7. He enjoys cooking. He likes sitting on the kitchen counter while I cook or wash dishes, and then batting things onto the floor below like a cat. A few days ago, he ripped the top off a spice container and dumped mixed herbs all over the floor. (see: excellent fine motor control.)
  8. He has a keen eye for decor. One of his favorites things to do is to unleash his collapsible tunnel just after I’ve put it away, only to ignore it for the rest of the day, as the real joy of the tunnel is in making me nuts.
  9. He is thoughtful. Yesterday after work and nursery, I presented him with some new Fisher Price Little People animals, and in order to show his appreciation, he grabbed a throw pillow, put it on the ground next to him, and pointed frantically at it until I got up from the couch and sat on the pillow on the floor, while he pretended that a small pink bird was eating my throat. He wanted to offer me up to the animals, but he also wanted me to be comfortable. #blessed
  10. He has priorities. He lets me to scroll through Facebook on my phone in the rare moments he wants to play alone, but I am not allowed to do anything productive in his presence, including but not limited to: using my laptop to write, reading a book, highlighting a paper for work, writing a letter, making grocery lists, etc.

My child, Wonder Baby.

*Yes, I am counting animal noises as words. YES I AM.

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Sarah Carter is a PhD student, blogger, wife, expat, and new mom crazy person. She’s currently focused on getting The New Motherhood off the ground (while writing up her second PhD paper and taking care of her baby), but if you’re into snooping and terrible photos, check her out on Instagram.

Parenting: Day 404 (Or: Why I Am Always A Mess)

SARAH CARTER

12am: I’ve been asleep since 9:45pm! I’m starting the day off with 2 hours and 15 minutes of uninterrupted sleep! Today is gonna be great!

1:01am: Baby wakes up. Demands being nursed back to sleep.

2:48 am: Baby wakes up. For fun, I decide to try not nursing him back to sleep. Baby has a meltdown. I am terrified of being awake for three hours. I nurse him back to sleep.

3:55am: Baby wakes up.

4:58am: Baby wakes up.

5:51am: Baby wakes up FOR THE DAY.

6:43am: Baby poops, which I notice after it escapes his diaper. I put down my coffee (Mug 1) and my husband and I scrub baby poo out of the carpet in three different locations.

7:02am: I clear a path into Baby’s room by putting away all the books, toys, and stuffed animals laying all over the place.

7:03am: Baby pulls every book off his shelves and onto his feet. Baby cries.

7:15am: Baby has breakfast. He gets covered in yogurt. I take advantage of his being locked in his high chair and fold dry laundry after putting a new load into the washing machine.

7:30am: Baby finishes breakfast and is cleaned off with baby wipes. He immediately runs to the French doors to the garden and smears his wet, still-yogurt-y hands all over the glass before turning to his left and rubbing them all over some clean laundry.

7:32am: While washing dishes at the sink, I discover that I smell like the inside of a male wrestler’s gym bag. I begin to strategize a shower.

7:33am: I make black tea while Baby pounds at the French doors.

7:34am: It’s already warm enough outside that I let Baby into the garden wearing just a diaper. I watch him ride his plastic rocking horse over unfortunate bugs and push his Cozy Coupe into flower beds, thinking about how cute he is. Before I can stop him, he uses a measuring cup to drink some old water out of a bucket.

7:49am: Baby bores of dragging an outdoor broom around the garden patio and comes inside with fistfuls of sidewalk chalk, which he gets on the door frames and hardwood floors on the way back into the house.

7:51am: I am tired of running interference as Baby attempts to navigate the big step from inside to outside over and over, so I open the baby gate to the stairs. Baby senses danger and begins crawling upstairs.

7:51am: Excited by making it all the way up, Baby slams his face directly into the open baby gate at the top of the stairs. I abandon my black tea on stairs (Mug 2) and hold him as he screams in my face.

7:51am: I realize I am holding him while sitting on the wet patch where I’d scrubbed poo out of the carpet an hour ago.

7:54am: Baby is now happily rummaging through the diaper bag as I attempt to put away some laundry. I’ve given up on nice things, so I don’t care when my prescription glasses get thrown across the room.

7:55am: Baby is too quiet, which is how I discover that he’s eaten half a tube of Aquaphor Baby moisturizer.

7:55-7:58am: Full blown panic mode. Aquaphor Baby packaging tells me to seek medical help or call Poison Control if the cream is ingested, which is fantastic because that Aquaphor Baby is from the US and I’m in the UK and don’t know what the English equivalent of Poison Control is. I imagine we’ll have to go to the hospital and I wonder how I’m going to explain to my husband that I didn’t notice our son sucking down a bunch of ointment poison. I’ll have to call an ambulance. I am keenly aware that I smell horrible.

7:58am: The internet tells me Aquaphor is just petroleum jelly and lanolin, and at worst, Baby will have diarrhea. This is fine because Poop is one of my skills now.

7:59am: Baby is back to his regularly scheduled programming, methodically taking folded clothing and diapers out of each of his three dresser drawers, cracking the spines on board books by folding them in on themselves, and dropping things behind the radiators.

8:03am: I go into the bathroom to prep for a shower, and Baby beelines for the toilet brush, climbing over a pile of toilet paper rolls and scattering them everywhere.

8:03am: I decide not to shower. I mean, it’s not like we have to go to the hospital.

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Sarah Carter is a PhD student, blogger, wife, expat, and new mom crazy person. She’s currently focused on getting The New Motherhood off the ground (while writing up her first PhD paper and taking care of her baby), but if you’re into snooping and old news, check the archives over at Whiny Baby